Editor - David Taylor

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Charlotte Beckett

Hi David

You raise great points about Fairtrade going mainstream as a brand. Just to clarify though, currently the only Cadbury product to be certified by Fairtrade is the Dairy Milk bar (in it's simple form, not the sub brands):

http://www.cadbury.com/ourresponsibilities/ethicaltrading/Pages/fairtrade.aspx

So a very important step in the right direction, but a bit of a way to go before we can honestly state that Cadbury is Fairtrade.

David Taylor (brandgym)

James,

Thanks very much for this excellent build. You add another important part of the equation.

another reminder of just how complex the whole area of BSR/CSR is, and that supply chain has gone from something you put up with to something of strategic importance!

David

James Gordon-MacIntosh

All of that is absolutely true, although it misses one bit in the chain.

Which is "there is enough production at high enough quality of the FairTrade/Free Range/ethically sourced product to satisfy the demands of a huge manufacturer".

Clearly, there has to be a virtuous circle of supply and demand here, but quite often it is supply as much as demand that is the sticking point.

Of course, once the big manufacturers are on board, the suppliers follow the money - as with McDonalds and Free Range eggs, for example: they couldn't do anything until there was enough supply. Once they did go Free Range, the market had to follow, so you get real change through the supply chain.

And then, of course, the next thing is that that standards are raised even further: traceability to source being the next big thing (I hope).

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